Moses’ God

I wrote earlier about vicarious man and the perils of such a lifestyle. Perhaps a better example of this lifestyle than the ones I gave earlier is the Children of Israel (COI) as they wandered in the desert. It appears just about none of them knew God personally, He was Moses’ God. When Moses went up on the mountain to worship God, then they worshipped God. Otherwise, He was a God to be avoided, feared and complained about. Joshua and Caleb were obvious exceptions to this charge that I am making but for the most part when we read about the COI they are grumbling and complaining about something Moses’ God had or hadn’t done. Normally, if you have a relationship with someone, you aren’t afraid to complain to them directly. But it’s hard to have a personal relationship with a God you are afraid of and fear too much to approach and, consequently, don’t trust. It’s hard, if not impossible, to have any sort of relationship with someone you don’t trust or talk to. I’ve seen this phenomena fleshed out in some churches which the youth see as their parent’s church and not theirs and so move on when they become young adults. I know there is more to it than just this but the point I’m trying to make is the challenges parents face in modeling for their children a personal relationship with God so they don’t settle for a vicarious one. It’s a problem Paul had to confront in 1 Cor 1:12 where some followed Paul, others Cephas, still others Apollos…..Part of the answer may be allowing them to make some of their own decisions and mistakes and living through the resultant consequences.

But when do we cross that dangerous line from following our parents, leaders to allowing them to think, choose, decide for us?

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About menmourningmoments

I'm happily married, the Father of 2 sons and 2 daughters and 4 beautiful grandchildren. Death is all around us but somehow we've managed to distance ourselves from it. Men, Mourning, Moments is about how the death of my son awakened me to life & the desire to seize every moment as though it were my last. It's about making sense of life in the good times and bad and allowing GOD to carry me and teach me through the hard times in life.
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2 Responses to Moses’ God

  1. Mike Petty says:

    Mason, this was outstanding. As the father of 2 and working with numerous young people in ministry, I have found as we teach children and young people about the Lord and things of God, that we are trying to speak while kids are surrounded by the “noise” of the world. That noise comes at them in a multitude of directions, the likes of which we “Boomers” were not subjected to as we grew up. Because of this “noise” I have found that young people need to know that what we are teaching and showing them is REAL. To them talk has become cheap and words have very little meaning. Therefore, like Moses, who himself admitted he was not a good communicator, demonstrated the reality of an active and present God in our faith journey’s by living it in his life whether in front of Pharoh or in the desert. We too must demonstrate the reality and benefit of a Christ centered life, so that the young will see it and by seeing they can “Know”.

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    • Thanks for reading my blog and responding. You are so right about the noise bombarding our youth and them not really believing a speaker until he has proven him/herself trustworthy. Perhaps that’s why Jesus said follow Me rather than do as I say. More than ever we have to walk the talk don’t we. Thanks for your comment Mike and hope to hear more from you.

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